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Tag: New Orleans

Andy Milne & Unison Offer a Perfect Way To End Cleveland’s Perfect Jazz Weekend

Andy Milne and Unison

Everywhere you look, there are signs that the local jazz scene might again look like the one that went on leave in March, 2020. Reading the tea leaves, the return of the Tri-C Jazz Fest to Playhouse Square is huge tell. That tentpole event needs no introduction from me, just a hope that you’ll go and enjoy the great music on offer.

But there’s one more jazz event you should make room for this weekend. It’s the return to Cleveland’s Bop Stop of pianist Andy Milne and his Unison trio for a welcome if long-overdue tour to support his latest recording The reMission (you can read my review of that record here).

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Roll Call: March 8, 2022

I get a lot of music for my consideration, already more than 160 new releases in 2022. Almost all of them are notable for something, and I’d like to give them their due. So, when I’m not previewing live events in Northeast Ohio, I’ll offer hot takes on recent releases. Like these.

Anniversaries and theme celebrations generally make writers groan, but editors love them. At let’s call this, I wear both hats, and this week I’ll give my editor side the benefit of the doubt. Thus today’s Women’s History Month roundup of notable new releases by women. There’s more than a common editorial conceit behind the post; these four recordings are outstanding by any measure and make a strong case for the increasing and long overdue prominence of women who play, write for and lead bands at the forefront of improvised music in the Black American tradition.

Julieta Eugenio JUMP cover

Looking at the cover photo for JUMP (Greenleaf Music), you might be forgiven for mistaking tenor saxophonist Julieta Eugenio for a teenager, but she is no kid. 

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Roll Call: February 27, 2021

I get a lot of music for my consideration, more than 460 new releases in 2020. Almost all of them are notable for something, and I’d like to give them their due. So, every week, more or less, I’ll offer hot takes on the releases of the preceding seven days.

Publicity for guitarist/composer/sound designer Colin Cannon‘s “McGolrick,” calls it a “dizzying suite,” and, well, truth in advertising. In Cannon’s free-associative chamber-pop/prog rock daydream, anything is likely to bob to the surface including looped vocals, á la Steve Reich’s “It’s Going To Rain,” New Orleans parade music, tender guitar lullabies and even a found sound sample: “Livin’ on government cheese.” That’s a status update for 2020 if ever there was one. Yet Cannon binds it all together with an artistic vision that centers on playful logic. If you’re inclined to dream about what modern urban life was like in the sensation-soaked year before lockdown (and who isn’t?), it probably sounds like this.

 

Drummer Joe Chambers was one of those Blue Note regulars who, like alto saxophonist James Spaulding and fellow drummer Billy Higgins, were essential to the label’s sound, but who nonetheless didn’t lead a session during the golden age. Looking at the cover art with its vivid duotone photograph and classic Reid Miles-inspired design, it would be easy to mistake “Samba de Maracatu” for a newly unearthed Chambers-led session from, say, 1968. But the recording was made last June in North Carolina where the 78-year-old Chambers now lives. For a rhythm master of his reputation, it’s an oddly disembodied record, perhaps because the leader overdubbed drums, vibraphone and other percussion instruments. The distant and room-tone-y recording ambience adds to the sensation. Pianist Brad Merritt and bassist Steve Haines, both North Carolina-based, are solid in just the sort of accompanying roles that made Chambers’ reputation more than a half-century ago.

 

With “Our Highway,” (Outside In Music), the collective Cowboys and Frenchmen present a quintet-sized tone parallel to Maria Schneider’s “Data Lords.” As in Schneider’s 2020 big-band magnum opus, the peace and beauty of the natural world is contrasted with the hamster-wheel frenzy of modern life. Yet saxophonist Ethan Helm, who composed all of the material here, is more interested in portraiture than polemic. “Our Highway” is a road memoir, a sketchbook of things seen, heard and felt by a touring musician in pre-lockdown America. In the pastoral sections there are echoes, both in the writing and playing, of Keith Jarrett’s American Quartet. The contrasting sections come at you with an exciting Red Bull rush that owes something to the cinematic ambition and nervy energy of Bobby Previte’s late 80s conceptual projects. But Helm, fellow saxophonist Owen Broder, pianist Addison Frei—a standout here–bassist Ethan O’Reilly and fast-twitch drummer Matt Honor, play with a cool, Millennial detachment that feels very much of the moment. There is an accompanying video. It’s interesting but unnecessary. Music this evocative needs no outside help.

At its apogee, the Blue Note Records catalog was an index of the state of New York hard bop and postbop in the 60s. But alongside classic sessions by Lee Morgan, Wayne Shorter and Sam Rivers was a parallel catalog of booty-shaking, jukebox-friendly work by Jimmy Smith, Stanley Turrentine and Ike Quebec. In his quest to preserve the Blue Note legacy, Posi-Tone Records producer and label head Marc Free has honored both traditions. I’ll have more to say about recent Posi-Tone releases in the classic hard bop vein soon, but meanwhile here is trombonist Michael Dease almost splitting the difference on “Give It All You Got.” On the one side, he’s joined by tenor saxophonist Gregory Tardy and trumpeter Anthony Stanco on a beefy, very Messengers-like front line. On the other is a smoky, groove-oriented rhythm section of Jim Alfredson’s B-3 and drummer Ulysses Owens, Jr., who keeps up a lively commentary with the horns that would be the envy of any Twitter addict. Vamps abound, Gwendolyn Dease’s percussion adds flavor to the Caribbean-flavored items and everyone has a good time. And who writes churchy, rocking-chair swingers like Dease’s “Word To The Wise” anymore?

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